It makes sense that decreasing your risk of life-threatening conditions would lead to a longer life. “A 5 percent loss can lower your risk of diabetes, heart disease, and cancer, so yes, it may indeed extend your life,” Sass says. Dr. Webster agrees that losing even a small amount of weight can improve overall health, though official reports haven’t confirm this. “Although 5 percent weight loss improves health and decreases the risk factors for serious diseases, we do not know if this will translate into an increase in lifespan, because that study has never been done,” Dr. Klein says. The reverse, though, has been shown: Those with a high BMI have a greater overall mortality risk. In any case, if you’re looking to feel better both inside and out, it doesn’t take a major weight transformation—just a few pounds will do. Find out how much your life expectancy goes down for every two pounds you gain.
After training with bodyweight exercises for a month or so, you’ll definitely notice your body beginning to change. You’ll become stronger and begin to bounce back from those workouts more easily than before. However, weight loss doesn’t come from exercise alone. Combining your workouts with a diet including a wide variety of nutritious foods will ensure your body is functioning optimally. Controlling portion sizes will also not only help you reach your weight loss goals faster, but keep that weight off long-term.
Fighting constantly with your S.O.? It’s time to address your issues head-on. "Research has shown that cortisol, the hormone that's released during stressful activity, is linked to fat storage,” says Gina Guddet, couples counselor and co-author of Love Metabolism. “And poor communication between couples is the most common type of stress that you tend to experience."
A Credit Suisse Research Institute report found that more and more of us are choosing full-fat foods over skim, light, fat-free, or other modern monikers of leanness. And while many health organizations like the American Heart Association still recommend cutting down on fat—particularly saturated fat—this full-fat trend may be a healthy rebellion against those decades-old credos, according to recent studies. In fact, people who eat a lot of high-fat dairy products actually have the lowest incidence of diabetes, according to a 2015 study of 26,930 people in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Those who ate a lot of low-fat dairy products, on the other hand, had the highest incidence. So what’s the best way to join the full-fat revolution? Eat This, Not That! polled some of the country’s top nutrition experts and asked for their favorite full-fat fat burners. Check out what they said in our exclusive report The 20 Best Full-Fat Foods for Weight Loss.

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