Good news for carb lovers: Scientists discovered an easy way to slim down any bowl of rice by as much as 60 percent! And the best part is that you don’t need a fancy lab or a PhD. to make the slimmed-down dish. Here’s how to whip it up: Add a teaspoon of coconut oil and a half cup of non-fortified white rice to a pot of boiling water. Cook it for about 40 minutes, stick it in the refrigerator for 12 hours and enjoy the rice either cold or reheated. How does such a simple cooking hack—that adds fat, no less—slash calories? When the rice begins to cool, its glucose molecules form tight bonds called “resistant starch.” This type of starch, as the name implies, is resistant to digestion, meaning that the body is not able to absorb as many calories or as much of the glucose (a nutrient that’s stored as fat if it’s not burned off) from each molecule. While you may be hesitant to add the oft-vilified oil to your pot, it actually plays an integral role in the process. As the rice cooks, the fat molecules find their way into the rice and act as an additional digestion barrier. Best of all, the research team found that reheating the rice didn’t change the levels of resistant starch (as it does with pasta and potatoes), deeming this calorie-slashing cooking hack safe for leftovers, too.

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
If you are serious about losing weight and you want more than just a boot camp, then check out some of these weight loss centers. They will likely come with an in-house personal trainer (or two) and scheduled fitness classes. The more serious centers will include a well-organized fitness program with a quality nutrition plan. You may have private workouts with a personal trainer and a nutrition coach to teach you healthy eating habits.
Just as big-box stores can be a psychologically tricky terrain for dieters, so to can healthy-sounding labels on the food that we eat. A Cornell University study printed in the Journal of Marketing Research suggests people eat more of a snack that’s marketed as “low fat.” Participants in the study ate a whopping 28 percent more M&Ms that were labeled “low fat” than when the colorful candies didn’t have the label. As we suggested earlier, avoid being fooled by simply opting for full-fat foods.
Every person has a different palate, a unique attitude toward food, and various likes and dislikes. That means you need to find a nutrition plan that works best for you. The phrase "healthy eating" gets thrown around a lot, but for many people, the changes needed to get there aren't as big as they think. It might just be replacing your usual snack for a healthier one, and fixing the one meal each day where you are most likely to overeat. 

Finally decided to venture out for a run? Snack on some beets before you hit the pavement. A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that runners who ate baked beets before a 5K race ran 5 percent faster. Researchers suspect this is because beets are high in nitrates, a natural chemical that increases endurance and lowers blood pressure.
Unfortunately, metabolic compensation isn’t your body’s only strategy to prevent weight loss or encourage weight gain. Hunger hormones – leptin and ghrelin – are also at play. Fat cells produce leptin, which tells your brain when you’re full. Fat cells also shrink when you lose weight, producing less leptin and meaning you don’t feel as full. Strike one. Ghrelin, produced by the stomach, tells the brain it’s time to refuel. When you lose weight, ghrelin levels rise, prompting you to want to eat more frequently. Strike two. Research suggests that neither leptin levels nor ghrelin levels return to a normal baseline for at least a year.
“InBody’s accuracy for measuring percentage body fat is superb--within 2%  accuracy of the result obtained by DEXA scanning (which has traditionally been the gold standard), but obviously quite difficult for people to access in the setting of a standard workout or weight loss program,” said Jeralyn Brossfeld, M.D., FACOG, an Obesity expert, Diplomate of the American Board of Obesity Medicine, and unpaid consultant for Inbody over the past several years, incorporating versions of the InBody 770 in her own medical practice.

In an analysis stratified by sex, significant associations with weight regain were observed for all individual PFASs in women, but not in men. Comparing the highest to the lowest tertiles, the least-square means (SEs) of weight regain in women were 4.0 (0.8) versus 2.1 (0.9) kg for PFOS (Ptrend = 0.01); 4.3 (0.9) versus 2.2 (0.8) kg for PFOA (Ptrend = 0.007); 4.9 (0.9) versus 2.7 (0.8) kg for PFHxS (Ptrend = 0.009); 4.7 (0.9) versus 2.5 (0.9) kg for PFNA (Ptrend = 0.006); and 4.2 (0.8) versus 2.5 (0.9) kg for PFDA (Ptrend = 0.03) (Table 3). Significant interactions with sex were demonstrated for PFOA and PFHxS (Pinteraction = 0.04 and 0.01, respectively). When the covariates were entered into the model in a stepwise manner, these results did not change materially (S3 Table). The trajectory of changes in body weight in men and women according to tertiles of PFAS concentrations is shown in Fig 1. The trajectory of changes in body weight among total participants is shown in S1 Fig.
Simply blasting the air conditioner, cracking a window open, or turning down the heat during the winter may help attack belly fat while we sleep, according to a study published in the journal Diabetes. That’s because colder temperatures subtly enhance the effectiveness of our brown fat stores—fat that keeps you warm by helping you burn through the fat stored in your belly. Participants spent a few weeks sleeping in bedrooms with varying temperatures: a neutral 75 degrees, a cool 66 degrees, and a balmy 81 degrees. After four weeks of sleeping at 66 degrees, the subjects had almost doubled their volumes of brown fat. (And yes, that means that they lost belly fat.)

At 9 a.m., I take a fitness class. My current go-to is a treadmill interval class, which energizes me in a whole different way than a cup of coffee does. That is followed by a medicine ball class done with partners, which is a fun way to combine strength and cardio training. Next is a group meditation, followed by an hour to recover, read, or write in my journal.


Christy is a spokesperson, nutrition and food writer and blogger for Huffington Post and others, a recipe developer and YouTube video producer. She is regularly interviewed by CTV National News, CBC, The Globe and Mail and many more on nutrition and health. She has her finger on the pulse of the latest nutrition and food science and trends, and synthesizes and prioritizes it just for you.
Good question, Craig. As I posted above, HS wrestlers (also, many other grappling sport athletes) aren’t given the full 24 hours to recover from depletion. Some sports have mat-side weigh-ins. Others are just given a few hours after weigh-in to replenish. For these sports, athletes are best served focusing on year-round nutrition strategies, ones that help them stay at a weight very close to the weight they’d like to compete at.

A great way of getting around this problem is to try and make at least one social activity between you and your friends revolve around fitness. So whether that's building up a tennis league within your group, going for a long country walk instead of being sat down the pub or joining a weekly fitness class together, you will be able to see your mates as well as keep your weight loss on track.

PFASs are extensively used in many industrial and consumer products, including food packaging, paper and textile coatings, and non-stick cookware [31–34]. A recent study reported that the drinking water supplies for at least 6 million US citizens may exceed the US Environmental Protection Agency’s health advisory limit for lifetime exposure to PFOS and PFOA from drinking water [35]. In addition, these compounds are extremely stable in the environment and have a long elimination half-life in the human body [36], thus rendering PFASs a possible threat to human health. Due to the potential metabolic abnormalities associated with elevated PFAS levels, we aimed to examine the associations of PFAS exposure with changes in body weight and RMR in the well-designed and rigorously conducted POUNDS (Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies) Lost trial [37].

average weight for 40 year old female

×