“Tahini is an oft-forgotten option for nut and seed butters, but it sits front and center in my fridge because it delivers major creaminess to sauces and smoothies and packs a powerful flavor punch,” says Willow Jarosh MS, RD co-owner of C&J Nutrition. “Although some advise against eating the spread because of its high omega 3:6 ratio, the super high intake of omega-6s in the average American’s diet isn’t due to things like tahini—it’s mostly from not eating a variety of fats or consuming the majority of fats from fried foods and packaged snacks. As long as you’re also eating foods rich in omega-3s, your end-of-day ratio should be nothing to worry about. Plus, tahini is loaded with tons of healthy nutrients like copper, which helps maintain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the body. It also provides six percent of the day’s calcium in just one tablespoon.”
New York City-folk can plan a weekend getaway for one of Gurney's Montauk wellness retreats and score a customized schedule full of fitness and wellness activities geared to refresh your mind, body and—yep—soul. Whether you want an array of Dailey Method classes at their weekend retreat or days full of water sports as part of the Paddle Diva experience, you're pretty much guaranteed to find something that fits you best. Bonus: The resort's also partnered with Wellthily to host wellness weekends and pop-ups throughout the summer (you know, in case one weekend just isn't enough), featuring panel discussions and classes by top instructors and studios across the country (think Bari studio and New York Pilates, for starters).
“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.

why women gain weight after 40

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