Savor the finest fresh and healthy food at Hilton Head Health. Our executive chef’s love for food and nutrition shines through in True Restaurant’s multi-ethnic, locally sourced cuisine. Thoughtfully prepared meals and snacks served at True are the foundation of our weight loss and wellness programs. No matter your path or individual dietary needs, eating at True is truly a pleasure.
“Tahini is an oft-forgotten option for nut and seed butters, but it sits front and center in my fridge because it delivers major creaminess to sauces and smoothies and packs a powerful flavor punch,” says Willow Jarosh MS, RD co-owner of C&J Nutrition. “Although some advise against eating the spread because of its high omega 3:6 ratio, the super high intake of omega-6s in the average American’s diet isn’t due to things like tahini—it’s mostly from not eating a variety of fats or consuming the majority of fats from fried foods and packaged snacks. As long as you’re also eating foods rich in omega-3s, your end-of-day ratio should be nothing to worry about. Plus, tahini is loaded with tons of healthy nutrients like copper, which helps maintain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant responses in the body. It also provides six percent of the day’s calcium in just one tablespoon.”

The base for Wildfitness is a Victorian stone lodge in a whopping 23,000 acres of dramatic mountains and inky-black lochs. Wild workouts include scrambling up steep mossy banks, walking along wooden planks with eyes closed and slacklining above whirling rivers. During downtime you'll want to disappear under your duvet in the tartan- and tweed-trussed bedrooms (ask for a highland view). Meals are protein-packed: Scotch egg wrapped in venison for lunch and bone broth with fishcakes for supper. The highlight of the week is a youthful version of the Highland games: welly throwing, caber lifting, shot putting, rope jumping and a highly competitive tug of war. It can seem hard at first, but somehow you'll do it anyway and feel mighty proud of yourself afterwards - with a reshaped body to boot.


“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.

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