In addition to improving your health, maintaining a weight loss is likely to improve your life in other ways. For example, a study of participants in the National Weight Control Registry* found that those who had maintained a significant weight loss reported improvements in not only their physical health, but also their energy levels, physical mobility, general mood, and self-confidence.

One reason for this is that many products labeled "low fat," "light," and "reduced fat" (things like yogurt, ice cream, and peanut butter) are highly processed and engineered to taste like their original full-fat predecessors. To accomplish this, food manufacturers typically add extra sugar — and sugar, unlike fat, has been strongly implicated as a leading factor contributing to obesity and weight gain.
Hey Stevo, absolutely not! All the weight loss is water weight and it all comes back pretty quickly. For someone who has 50 pounds to lose, they’d be looking for fat loss. And this certainly isn’t a fat loss plan. If you’re looking for something to help your friend, google “Lean Eating for Men”. It’s a weight loss coaching program that is designed to help people who typically have trouble with “compliance” (sticking to a diet for only 3 weeks). Hope that helps.

“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.

why women gain weight after 40

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